Clayton Lane at Cherry Creek North

Denver, Colorado

Completion

2004

Client

Nichols Partnership

Size

9.5 acres; 500,000 SF

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Scope of Work

Architect of Record, Master Planning

Between December 2001 and March 2004 the Nichols Partnership redeveloped 9.5 acres into Clayton Lane, Denver’s premier mixed-use development. Clayton Lane was the last large parcel to be developed in land-constrained Cherry Creek North. The development’s transformation from suburban to an active, vibrant live-work-play neighborhood sets the standard for mixed-use urban infill.

The development emerged from a free-standing Sears store and a 650-car surface lot to a dynamic, integrated development. The walkable, pedestrian-friendly neighborhood features 710,000 sf of uses—hotel, retail, office, and residential. To accommodate these uses, parking was constructed in both underground and structured parking facilities.

Restoring the Street Grid

Restoring the street grid was catalytic to this human-scaled, mixed-use development in Denver’s iconic Cherry Creek North. Recessed facades, broad, detailed sidewalks and street furniture invite shoppers and strollers to enjoy Clayton Lane. The unifying strength and hallmark of the development is retail, with high visibility spaces throughout every building, anchored by a new private street, Clayton Lane.

Design, Texture and Detail

The project’s unifying strength is exhibited in high-visibility retail spaces. The design palette features a variety of materials and textures—brick, limestone, zinc panels, chrome, and wood.  Thoughtful massing and detailed fenestration optimize interior light within the Tryba-designed structures while street level detail beckons both visitor and passer-by.

Scale of Construction

The development team was challenged with redeveloping, phasing and financing a $160 million, mixed-use project on a particularly active, compact development site. Initial neighborhood opposition and zoning variances to allow for the height and density necessary to support an office building and luxury hotel in Denver’s most restrictive district required years of negotiations and extensive layers of approvals. Highly coordinated and proactive efforts were needed to maintain composure in the congested community during construction.